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When the NBN rolls out in your area

by Rachael McIntyre

With the NBN rollout making its way around the country, there are plenty of questions flying around about how the new network will be put in place. Before Australian households can begin receiving superfast speeds via the NBN fibre network, they’ll first need to have it rolled out in their area and to their house. The process will be a little different for NBN wireless and satellite customers – more on that in the next article!

When can I expect to get the NBN?

It’s going to take about 10 years for the NBN plan to be completed, but the areas set to be connected over the next 12 months have already been announced. To see if you’re in one of the lucky first areas, check out the rollout plan.  If your area isn’t on the list, stay tuned as NBN Co will now be providing regular construction updates each quarter. They’ll also be releasing a three-year construction plan in the first quarter of 2012.

What’s the process when the NBN gets delivered to your area?

To make things a bit simpler, let’s take a look at the steps involved in getting connected.

Step one – a field construction team will mosey on over to your street and check out the location of poles and pits to design the network for your area. This will take between two and four days.

Step two – The construction workers at NBN Co will cordon off certain areas of your street and begin the construction, placing Fibre Distribution Hubs (FDH) according to their designs. If your area requires underground work, this could take up to 10 days. The overhead option should only take three days*.

Step three – The connection will be made to your house as required. This all depends on when you’d like to sign up to an NBN plan with your Internet service provider (otherwise known as a Retail Service Provider).

Step four – Once you’ve connected with your ISP of choice, you’ll begin using your superfast Internet and wonder how you ever got by without it.

But what about my garden bed?

A concern for many people is what state their property and street will be in post-NBN installation. In order to limit a lot of construction work NBN Co will be using the existing infrastructure that holds the copper network – the underground ducts or overhead cables. Rest assured if any construction occurs to your street frontage, roadway, nature strip or garden, they will be restored to near new condition.

How do I get connected?

When the NBN rolls out in your area, simply call up your Internet service provider (that’s us!) and sign up to a plan. We’ll be your point of contact for anything relating to your new NBN connection.

Where can I find out more?

If you’d like to learn more about the NBN, head to iiNet’s NBN web page. Once there, you’ll be able to sign up for local updates, watch a few “NBN explained” videos, view coverage maps, check out our NBN pricing or rifle through our NBN FAQs. If you’d like to read more about NBN’s wireless and satellite connections, head to their webpage.

*Time frames are indicative only. Depending on the conditions encountered during construction, the time may be a little longer.

6 comments

  1. Adrian says:

    So no north of the river suburbs will get it in the initial roll-out. Wonder where the members of parliament/public servants that decide this live? Not north of the river.

  2. John says:

    The following statement appears to be contrary to Government publications which have stated that a house connection/installation does not depend on on signing up to an ISP:- Step three – The connection will be made to your house as required. This all depends on when you’d like to sign up to an NBN plan with your Internet service provider (otherwise known as a Retail Service Provider).
    Please clarify

  3. Mal says:

    I live in Vic Park and your NBN web page claims that we were proposed to have the NBN rollout in September of this year yet i’ve hear nothing. What gives?

  4. John says:

    If as stated in the article “. In order to limit a lot of construction work NBN Co will be using the existing infrastructure that holds the copper network – the underground ducts” NBN use existing ducts in many areas of Rockingham City where they are only 50 to 200mm below ground level there are crazy. I am not surprised iiNet are insisting that NBN be responsible for network reliability.

  5. Darren says:

    The Roll Out plan is not fast enough for my liking. My current adsl2+ iinet connection downloads at 70kbps…super-slow! I will sign up with NBN ASAP.

  6. Al says:

    What a Joke, !0 years, I ‘m still on broadband 1 with iinet, and they still haven’t been able to fix the congestion issue in my new area (Coogee) for 2 years, I love how they think its going to work out since they get all the tech and infrastructure from Telstra. When something goes wrong, and it will, that period will start looking like 20 years not ten. Experienced this with both iiNet and Telstra, they are very good at blame games and taking peoples money. In 2011 I’m paying for broadband 1 ($100/m) at speeds 10k/s. I wounder what the blame game will be in next ten years when nothing happens.

    13 years tenure with iinet

    Mr Optimist

    Merry Xmass

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